CREDITS FOR "FAIR USE" MUSIC SAMPLES USED IN

A CUBA WHERE THE ISLAND SLEEPS LIKE A WING*                                

 

           VIDA y MUERTE DEL SANTERO by Alberlado Larduet Luaces, Proyecto EGREM Casa del Caribe

 

                    SANTISIMO, AFRO-CUBAN SANTERIA by Emilio Baretto, Luz Production, NYC., 1979.

                                                                (“Elegba Rezo” and “Elegba Tratado”)

 

                           CANTO A LOS ORISHAS, feat. LAZARO ROS, EGREM, Casa del Caribe, 2008

                                                                                           (“Orula”)

 

                                       MATANZAS CUBA, ca, 1957, by Lydia Cabrera and Josefina Tarafa,

                                                                     Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

                                          (“Toque Yesa for Inle,””Toque Yesa for Ochun,””Toque Egbado”)

 

                          SPIRIT RHYTHMS—SACRED DRUMMINGS & CHANTS FROM CUBA, Orlando

                “Puntilla” Rios & Nueva Generacion, Latitudes Publ., 1987, 1996 by Angel Romero and

         Bob Haddad,  World Music Institute, an exclusively non-profit concert presenting organization.

                                                                        (“Aichara Icha,” and “Maiseboa”)

 

                                  THE MUSIC OF SANTERIA, JOHN AMIRA & STEVEN CORNELIUS, 1994

                                             (“Elegua,” “Ochosi,” “Obatala,” “Agayu,” “Ochun,””Chango”)

 

               AFRO-CUBAN SACRED MUSIC FROM THE COUNTRYSIDE, Domingo Hernandez, Marcelle

                                                                              Carreras & Angel, 2001

                                                                  (“Toque Arara,”“Shango””Yemaja”)

 

                                                     BUENA VISTA SOCIAL CLUB, Ibrahim Ferrer, 1997,

                                                                                     (“Dos Gardenas”)

                                                         Nonesuch Records, Time-Warner Company, 1997

                  *The title “Where The Island Sleeps Like A Wing” is taken from a volume of poetry by    

                                                  Nancy Morejon, Black Scholar Press, San Francisco, 1983

 

 

  *USE OF THE SHORT MUSIC SAMPLES [<20’secs] INCLUDED IN “A CUBA— WHERE THE  ISLAND SLEEPS LIKE A WING,”  IS AUTHORIZED AS A NON-COMMERCIAL, PRIVATE, TRAVELOGUE SLIDE SHOW FOR PRIVATE AUDIENCES AND SCHOOLS UNDER THE FAIR USE DOCTRINE AT

17 U.S.C. §107 et seq. APPROPRIATE FOR PRIVATE NON-PROFIT & NON-COMMERCIAL, EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES. SAMPLES ARE OF < 20 SECONDS OR  LESS) 

         

                                                                                                 More Information on Fair Use

 

                                                        Last updated September 2017https://www.copyright.gov/fair-use/more-info.html

 

“Fair use is a legal doctrine that promotes freedom of expression by permitting the un- licensed use of copyright-protected works in cer- tain circumstances. Section 107 of the Copyright Act provides the statutory framework for determining whet- her something is a fair use and identifies certain types of uses—such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research—as examples of activities that may qualify as fair use.  Section 107 calls for consideration of the following four factors in evaluating a question of fair use: Purpose and character of the use, including whether the use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes:  Courts look at how the party claiming fair use is using the copy- righted work, and are more likely to find that nonprofit educational and non- commercial uses are fair. This does not mean, however, that all non- profit education and noncommercial uses are fair and all commercial uses are not fair; instead, courts will balance the purpose and character of the use against the other factors below.

 

“Additionally, “transformative” uses are more likely to be considered fair. Transformative uses are those that add some- thing new, with a further purpose or different character, and do not substitute for the original use of the work. Nature of the copyrighted work: This factor analyzes the degree to which the work that was used relates to copyright’s purpose of encouraging creative expression. Thus, using a more creative or imaginat- ive work (such as a novel, movie, or song) is less likely to support a claim of a fair use than using a factual work (such as a technical article or news item). In addition, use of an un- published work is less likely to be considered fair.

 

“Amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole:  Under this factor, courts look at both the quantity and quality of the copyrighted material that was used. If the use includes a large portion of the copyrighted work, fair use is less likely to be found; if the use employs only a small amount of copyrighted mat- erial, fair use is more likely. That said, some courts have found use of an entire work to be fair under certain circumstances. And in other contexts, using even a small amount of a copyrighted work was determined not to be fair because the selection was an important part—or the “heart”—of the work.

 

“Effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work:  Here, courts review whether, and to what extent, the unlicensed use harms the existing or future market for the copyright own- er’s original work. In assessing this factor, courts consider whet- her the use is hurting the current market for the original work (for example, by displacing sales of the original) and/or whether the use could cause substantial harm if it were to become widespread. In addition to the above, other factors may also be consid- ered by a court in weighing a fair use question, depending upon the circum- stances. Courts evaluate fair use claims on a case-by-case basis, and the outcome of any given case depends on a fact-specific inquiry. This means that there is no formula to ensure that a predetermined percentage or amount of a work—or specific number of words, lines, pages, copies—may be used without permission.